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Pierced Problems

Girl with Pierced TongueA Pierced Tongue, Lip, or Cheek

A pierced body part may be essential to your style, but if it involves the mouth, it may not be the best choice in regards to your oral health. If you do have a piercing or are thinking about getting one, make sure you consider the potential effects and make an informed decision.

Might be a dental hazard!

Initially, getting any piercing causes trauma, and (because it is an open wound) there is always a risk of infection. Sterilization standards are essential to reduce this possibility. Also, the tongue has delicate veins and nerves that may suffer damage during the process.

Once healing has occurred, the most significant hazard with an oral piercing is the potential for injury. If you accidentally bite down when chewing or speaking, teeth may be chipped or broken. Additionally, a blow to the face can cause similar tooth damage or a laceration to soft tissues.

Other pierced tongue issues.

Another aspect to think about is the effects on your speech. Anyone with a pierced tongue will tell you that it takes some adjustment. You may find yourself temporarily slurring your words, either due to producing extra saliva or because of the piercing hardware itself.

Eating may become more of a challenge, as well as the ability to brush and floss all parts of your teeth properly. Food debris can even end up getting stuck in the pierced site, so make sure you keep it clean!

About Dr. Sean Moran

Dr. Moran is a San Francisco native. He received his undergraduate degree at Creighton University in Omaha, Nebraska. He also received his DDS degree from Creighton University School of Dentistry in 1988 at which time he began practicing general dentistry in San Francisco.

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